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George and Jane Boleyn studies by suburbanbeatnik George and Jane Boleyn studies by suburbanbeatnik
Here's a more developed drawing of George Boleyn, Anne Boleyn's proud, womanizing brother, and his wife Jane, best known for her betrayal of him (her testimony regarding his alleged incest with Anne sent him to the headsman). Here is my first sketch here: [link]

Most novels have portrayed Jane as a mousy, nagging sort, but since she had a starring role in a court masque she was certainly pretty (as lead roles in court masques were not given to unattractive wallflowers). Both she and her husband shared a love of luxury- they had a bed of cloth of gold- but had no children, which must have provided some interesting difficulties in their relationship, as George's father Thomas was an ambitious, domineering type, and Jane was the only daughter of a wealthy titled scholar. Their marriage must have seemed initially like a wonderful thing, since they were both worldly, good looking young people, but we all know how the marriage worked out in the end. One wonders what their conversations were like.

I haven't read the recent biography of Jane Boleyn by Julia Fox, but Hilary Mantel- one of my favorite authors- wrote a very interesting review of the book here, with lots of good information about this enigmatic couple. [link]
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:iconsavivi:
savivi Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2009  Professional Digital Artist
Jane is PERFECT. And George is sporting that kick ass, sexy for the time hair.

I love in The Tudors, how they completely disregard men's hair. They'd rather buzz it off, then make Jonathon Rhys Myers look accurate... and really, he should be large, limping, and not so handsome right about now.

I adore the show, but it drives me insane when women just shrug off their dresses, and they're naked. ONE: You don't just shrug off those garments. TWO: You better be wearing a corset and a shift underneath. And maybe a chastity belt... actually, with Henry, definitely a chastity belt.

Just once, ONCE, I'd like to see a love scene where the man and woman try to get a corset off.
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:iconsuburbanbeatnik:
suburbanbeatnik Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2009  Professional Traditional Artist
Every so often, I wonder, "should I see The Tudors?" But then I look at stills from the show, and I want to kill myself. Jesus, lycra corsets... polyvelvet... Victorian carriages, baroque couches, late Elizabethan doublets, 18th century style boobs-on-a-plate look and more cheap Thai silk than you can shake a stick at.. and of course, those goadawful buzzcuts on the guys. KILL ME NOW!

I don't think they would have had separate corsets back then. That's actually an Elizabethan innovation, I believe. The bodices themselves would have been boned. Or at least, that's what "The Tudor Tailor" says. And here's another article that says as much: [link]

Aren't chastity belts a medieval urban legend?
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:iconsavivi:
savivi Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2009  Professional Digital Artist
Ooh, fabulous to know about the boned bodices. I don't know the ins and outs of Tudor fashion, so I'll have to check out that book.

Chastity belts honestly were around by the 1500s... at least the designs for them. I doubt they were used often, though -- they seemed to be an awful design until they switched to leather. Not to mention the horrible chafing and nastiness for the woman.

But yeah, medieval chastity belts never existed.
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:iconsuburbanbeatnik:
suburbanbeatnik Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2009  Professional Traditional Artist
So, why do you like "The Tudors"? Is it a guilty pleasure? God knows I like Gossip Girl enough, even when I know it's just an updated 90210.

I've never heard of chastity belts actually used before, but most of what I know about the 16th century is pretty much centered around Mary, Queen of Scots. You mean there were other people living in the 1500s other than Mary Stuart!? Hahaha... yeah, my knowledge of 16th century stuff is kind of sketchy. But I'm trying to change that. The more you know...! [link]
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:iconsavivi:
savivi Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2009  Professional Digital Artist
I will honestly watch anything period related, accurate or not. And the Tudors fits the mold -- I always take what it does with a grain of salt, but the romance mixed with the politics and religion interests me. And the man who plays Brandon is SMOKIN'. Jonathon Rhys Myers is a little too intense for me.

I bet, though, that Anne of Cleves is going to look like an anorexic model.
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:iconsuburbanbeatnik:
suburbanbeatnik Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2009  Professional Traditional Artist
I think Jane Seymour looks like a Barbie doll, from the pictures I've seen. I think, though, I could only watch this show with lots of booze and friends around, to make fun of it. :P
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:iconsavivi:
savivi Featured By Owner Jan 30, 2009  Professional Digital Artist
From what I remembered of Jane Seymour, she had a vapid quality to her -- and massive boobage.

I liked Anne's toughness and harpy edge -- every other woman had no personality compared to her, so I'm biding my time until Catherine Howard.

I did become quite sympathetic to Jane Parker... though it's been a while since I've watched it. George was a nasty ass to her....... that was ironic in a really gross way.
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:iconsuburbanbeatnik:
suburbanbeatnik Featured By Owner Jan 30, 2009  Professional Traditional Artist
What did Jane look like in The Tudors? I know they made George gay... Retha Warnicke (she wrote some revisionist Tudor history in the '80s) has a lot to answer for. :P

One wonders what they will do to Anne of Cleves in that show. Hmmm...
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(1 Reply)
:icongoonmann-85:
goonmann-85 Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2009
I love these designs! Jane looks perfect! The only thing I could criticize, is that I think George should have kinda younger looking hair, something a bit more sweepy to emphasize how fashionable he is.
Can't wait to see a finished one!
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:iconsuburbanbeatnik:
suburbanbeatnik Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2009  Professional Traditional Artist
Hmmm, I see what you mean, but I didn't want G. looking like Prince Valiant. [link] And I guess he should technically be wearing a beard, but I can't picture him with a beard. Too many years of watching him being played by clean-shaven actors, I suppose...

Anyway, glad you like- I just started working on the finish today! :D
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:icongoonmann-85:
goonmann-85 Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2009
Oh..my god. That pic actually hurt my stomach! Just so... wrong... I meant like sort of fluffy and wavy, with a freer form. I can't picture him with a beard either.
Can't wait to see it.
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:iconkingandrewi:
KingAndrewI Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2009  Student Artisan Crafter
I recently got Norris' book too and I love the drawing, even though some are a bit inaccurate, along with some of the info i.e. the drum farthingale.

I got the Fox bio for Christmas and will try to read it soon. It irritates me that they used a picture of Jane Seymour for the cover.
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:iconsuburbanbeatnik:
suburbanbeatnik Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2009  Professional Traditional Artist
Yeah, I've heard it has problems, but that's to be expected for something written in the '30s... at least it's more reliable than his medieval costume book, which was written in the '20s. The medieval book is really um, interestingly dated, including an assertion that women wore corsets in the 1100s (!!).

I haven't gotten to the drum farthingale section yet. What's wrong with it?

I've also heard people complain about the Seymour picture on the Fox bio... lazy book designers strike again!
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:iconkingandrewi:
KingAndrewI Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2009  Student Artisan Crafter
Well, read Sarah Lorraine's article here: [link] to see what I mean. Plus, Norris' illustration is kind of funky:
[link]
I can't remember what page it's on in the book (I really need to put post-its in there!).
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:iconsuburbanbeatnik:
suburbanbeatnik Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2009  Professional Traditional Artist
I've actually seen that article before. I don't think I really buy the idea that the wheel farthingale is a later invention, and that kind of silhouette can be created with padding. I've discussed that with a few friends who have studied this period extensively, and they say it's ridiculous. I sure don't know...
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:iconkingandrewi:
KingAndrewI Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2009  Student Artisan Crafter
Well, take a look:
[link]
Sure looks like a pretty good sillhouette to me.
Sarah also told me that she believes the wheel works for the very late Elizabethan and early 17th century styles but for the late 1580's-90's the bumroll is better.
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:iconsuburbanbeatnik:
suburbanbeatnik Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2009  Professional Traditional Artist
Hmm, I guess it works...? But I really don't really know all that much about the 1580s and '90s. I've read more about Jacobean fashion... and I can't believe that Anne of Denmark is getting that tea-table look with padding or bumrolls or whatever.

Sarah's costumes look way nicer than what I've seen in some recent movies.
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:iconkingandrewi:
KingAndrewI Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2009  Student Artisan Crafter
I do agree about that-the early Jacobean fashions look really hard to achieve with just a bumroll. I guess we'll never know, unless some extant garment period source pops up somewhere. *crosses fingers*

Sarah is a marvel to me. I hope I can have 1/10 of her talent someday.
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:iconsuburbanbeatnik:
suburbanbeatnik Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2009  Professional Traditional Artist
They could only dream of having costumes as nice as hers on "The Tudors," can't they? :D
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(1 Reply)
:iconalwisw:
Alwisw Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2009
Now that's one handsome fellow! :)
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:iconsuburbanbeatnik:
suburbanbeatnik Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2009  Professional Traditional Artist
He is quite dashing, isn't he? :D
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:iconalwisw:
Alwisw Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2009
Oh yes. :)
Nice work!
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:iconwingsandrings:
WingsandRings Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2009
I read the biography -- I didn't think it was that fabulous. About 90% of the book was actually about those surrounding her (Anne Boleyn, Henry VIII, Catherine Howard), and all of that information can be gotten just by reading Six Wives of Henry VIII. There just wasn't enough information on Jane to fill a postcard, much less a 300 page book.

I have to ask -- where do you get your references for the clothing? I looooove 12th-->16th century clothing, but can never find references that really help me understand what all the layers are and how they work together, etc. (ok, I just saw now you said "Tudor Costume", but do you have any recs for pre-Tudor fashions?)
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:iconsuburbanbeatnik:
suburbanbeatnik Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2009  Professional Traditional Artist
I think all the information I read in Hilary Mantel's review was pretty much all the pertinent info in the biography, but in a highly condensed form.

So far, the only 16th century era book I have is "Tudor Costume and Fashion" by Herbert Norris, and it's definitely dated in some ways since it's 70 years old, but it's a good place to start. I've heard good things about "The Tudor Tailor" by Ninya Mikhaila, and that's very new, and benefits from modern research. For a decent medieval/Renaissance overview, Iris Brooke's "English costume from the early middle ages through the 16th century" is worth a look, although it dates from the '30s, like Norris.

I'm still looking for good medieval reference. Most books I've seen about medieval costume (i.e. Norris' "Medieval Costume," or Mary Houston's "Medieval costume in England and France") have been highly unsatisfactory in one way or the other. So far, I've just read through all of these books, cross-checked them against each other, looked at whatever primary sources I can find online, and talked to medievalists to get their take on it. I know, it's kind of a pain in the ass, but I sure know more about medieval fashion now than I used to! :P
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:iconcolonelliamross:
ColonelLiamRoss Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2009  Professional Artisan Crafter
Oh WOW! It's great to see some Tudor sketches from you! Marvelous job on the clothing here, especially with George. Love his attitude too. If you ever did a sketch of Thomas More, I think that would make my millennium.

"as George's father Thomas was an ambitious, domineering type" Hahahaha, yeah, at times, eh?

Herbert Norris ftmw! :D
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:iconsuburbanbeatnik:
suburbanbeatnik Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2009  Professional Traditional Artist
Hey, thanks! :D George definitely seems like a guy with attitude, doesn't he? Maybe it comes of having a dad like Thomas Boleyn.

So, you're a big Thomas More fan? Then don't read this book!! [link]
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:iconcolonelliamross:
ColonelLiamRoss Featured By Owner Apr 29, 2009  Professional Artisan Crafter
This reaction is completely belated but are you kidding me? How on earth does she even draw those conclusions about More? Good lord. I wonder how this stuff hits the market....
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:iconsuburbanbeatnik:
suburbanbeatnik Featured By Owner Apr 30, 2009  Professional Traditional Artist
The book was actually published 15 years ago as a romance novel called "A Dangerous Liasion." God knows why it was dusted off and republished all these years later. Pretty inexplicable, eh?
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:iconalene:
Alene Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2009  Professional General Artist
Lovely costumes, and the sketchy look really compliments their opulence, somehow. ;) Everything about 1530s fashion is so big! The sketchiness brings that out in an appropriately big way.

And on a completely unrelated note, the US Life on Mars is coming here, so we'll check it out. =)
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:iconsuburbanbeatnik:
suburbanbeatnik Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2009  Professional Traditional Artist
Thank you! Those coats are gigantic, aren't they? They did a fine job on the men's fashions in "The Other Boleyn Girl"- I am annoyed it wasn't nominated for a best costume Oscar.

And I'm very excited about the new LoM tonight- yay! :D
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:iconalene:
Alene Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2009  Professional General Artist
I haven't seen it yet, but the costumes did look lovely. I love a good costume drama. =)

Good heavens, you mean it's still showing in America, and it's already coming here!? That must be some kind of miracle .... although the American shows seem to get here quicker than the British ones, for some reason. ;)
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:iconcabepfir:
cabepfir Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2009  Professional Traditional Artist
Gorgeous outfit for George, he's got the best tailor in town for sure!
Jane's expression is so intriguing. I also like the fact that she's not a common beauty, but a very specific woman.
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:iconsuburbanbeatnik:
suburbanbeatnik Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2009  Professional Traditional Artist
Thank you! It took me a while to figure out the outfit, the 1530s isn't my period of expertise, and I was unclear about what went where and the number of layers. I love those pimp coats, they make a guy's shoulders look huge.

I actually modeled Jane on Broadway actress Erin Dilly. [link] I kept picturing Jane as a chilly blonde with an impeccable education (she'd probably speak Latin on account of her father), and Erin's perfect at roles like that.
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:iconlieutenantdeath:
LieutenantDeath Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2009  Professional Digital Artist
I'm reading Phillipa Gregory's The Boleyn Inheritance and in there it said that Jane did in fact have a child with George-- a boy-- and she gave birth some time after his execution but she sent the baby to live with family. In the story, Jane talks about how jealous she was that George was a doting brother to Anne while she was pregnant with Elizabeth but paid no attention to her when she was pregnant. I'm not sure how much truth is behind it.

Wonderful drawings. The clothes are beautiful. I love a lot of your work =)
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:iconwingsandrings:
WingsandRings Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2009
Phillipa Gregory is infamous for playing fast and loose with historical facts. Since she writes historical fiction, this wouldn't be that frustrating if:

1: She didn't, in interiews, try to pass herself off as writing history, not historical fiction

and 2: If she wasn't writing about Tudor history. Tudor history is bat-dung crazy enough; it doesn't need more drama to add to it.
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:iconsuburbanbeatnik:
suburbanbeatnik Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2009  Professional Traditional Artist
You've just summed it up. I find Gregory quite annoying. It isn't just because she writes silly, fluffy novels, it's that she can be intolerably self-important about it. And it's not as if she's Dorothy Dunnett or Rosemary Sutcliffe...
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:iconwingsandrings:
WingsandRings Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2009
Ahh Dorothy Dunnett. My mother (the former British History grad student and all around history snob ;) ) recently said "A Philippa Gregory book is to a Dorothy Dunnett book as a Snuggie infomercial is to Shakespeare." Needless to say, I laughed so hard I cried.
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:iconsuburbanbeatnik:
suburbanbeatnik Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2009  Professional Traditional Artist
OMG LOL!

I knew I could never finish reading "The Other Boleyn Girl" when I came across the sentence, "Anne gurgled her sexy laugh." That's one of my favorite sentences of mediocre prose ever.
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:iconwingsandrings:
WingsandRings Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2009
Good lord, that's horrible. I'd be willing to bet even grocery store romance novels do better than that.

I just found a facebook group called "Philippa Gregory is NOT an historian!" I'm in Tudor History heaven.
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:iconsuburbanbeatnik:
suburbanbeatnik Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2009  Professional Traditional Artist
A lot of romance novelists are far better writers and researchers than Philippa Gregory. Thanks for sharing the FB group- I really got a kick out of reading the posts. Wow, that woman sure has a bloated sense of her own research abilities, doesn't she? (I can't believe she portrays Mary Queen of Scots with BLACK hair... and has Jane Seymour testifying at Anne Boleyn's trial... even old Hollywood movies get their history more correct.) And I'm glad to see I'm not the only one who notices how's she constantly uses sibling incest as a plot device. Yuck!
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:iconempressofheaven:
EmpressofHeaven Featured By Owner Aug 16, 2009
You know i thought that was odd! when i started reading it i was appalled. Why would she ever portray Mary Stuart with black hair?!!
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(1 Reply)
:iconsuburbanbeatnik:
suburbanbeatnik Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2009  Professional Traditional Artist
I don't think there's any truth in it. According to Hilary Mantel's review of the Fox biography, she says, "Their marriage seems to have produced no children. We can suppose that George was displeased to have no heir." You can read the full review here: [link]

I'm glad you like it! I just got my own copy of Herbert Norris' "Tudor Costume" and this is my way of celebrating. :D
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:iconlieutenantdeath:
LieutenantDeath Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2009  Professional Digital Artist
I need to pick up a book like that. I'm in love with Tudor and Elizabethan fashions.
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:iconsuburbanbeatnik:
suburbanbeatnik Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2009  Professional Traditional Artist
You should get it- it's quite cheap, and it has lots of pictures! [link] It was written in the '30s, and it is pretty dated in some ways, but it's still a great resource. I also want to get "The Tudor Tailor" eventually.
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:iconlieutenantdeath:
LieutenantDeath Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2009  Professional Digital Artist
I've heard of that one too. I went to the website but it doesn't have much there.
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:iconsuburbanbeatnik:
suburbanbeatnik Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2009  Professional Traditional Artist
The book looks pretty awesome- I actually learned a lot just looking at the patterns on the website!- but I can't afford it right now, and the local libraries don't carry a copy. Ah well, there's always interlibrary loan...
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:iconjacobea:
Jacobea Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2009  Hobbyist Writer
I should think that having had no children was a source of misery and maybe even shame for Jane-after all, that's pretty much all the Tudors (and people up until relatively recently :|) saw as a woman's purpose, to give birth to heirs :(
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:iconsuburbanbeatnik:
suburbanbeatnik Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2009  Professional Traditional Artist
I'm sure it was hard on George too, given who his father was. No Boleyns to carry on the family name! Gah, he must have never heard the end of it... and he probably took out on his wife. Isn't that how it usually happened? :P
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:iconjacobea:
Jacobea Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2009  Hobbyist Writer
Still, at least Jane could console herself with the fact that he couldn't lop her head off :lol:
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:iconleppardra:
Leppardra Featured By Owner Nov 5, 2010
Heh-heh, no, that was done five years later when Jane went to the scaffold with Henry VIII's fifth wife, Catherine Howard, for aiding and abetting Catherine's adulterous behavior in Henry's absence. :nod:
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